Letters and Politics

Globalization and Trade Agreements: Lessons from the Euro Zone. And, Belle La Follete: Progressive Era Reformer

With Nobel Prize Laurate, Joseph E. Stiglitz, professor of economics at Columbia University.  He is a former chief economist of the World Bank and is former  member and chairman of the (US president’s) Council of Economic Advisers. He is known for his critical views of the management of globalization, free market economics and some international institutions like the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.

Professor Stiglitz is author of many books, his latest  The Euro: How a Common Currency Threatens the Future of Europe

 

About the book: Euro_Stglitz

In 2010, the 2008 global financial crisis morphed into the “eurocrisis.” It has not abated. The 19 countries of Europe that share the euro currency―the eurozone―have been rocked by economic stagnation and debt crises. Some countries have been in depression for years while the governing powers of the eurozone have careened from emergency to emergency, most notably in Greece.

In The Euro, Nobel Prize–winning economist and best-selling author Joseph E. Stiglitz dismantles the prevailing consensus around what ails Europe, demolishing the champions of austerity while offering a series of plans that can rescue the continent―and the world―from further devastation.

Hailed by its architects as a lever that would bring Europe together and promote prosperity, the euro has done the opposite. As Stiglitz persuasively argues, the crises revealed the shortcomings of the euro. Europe’s stagnation and bleak outlook are a direct result of the fundamental challenges in having a diverse group of countries share a common currency―the euro was flawed at birth, with economic integration outpacing political integration. Stiglitz shows how the current structure promotes divergence rather than convergence. The question then is: Can the euro be saved?

After laying bare the European Central Bank’s misguided inflation-only mandate and explaining how eurozone policies, especially toward the crisis countries, have further exposed the zone’s flawed design, Stiglitz outlines three possible ways forward: fundamental reforms in the structure of the eurozone and the policies imposed on the member countries; a well-managed end to the single-currency euro experiment; or a bold, new system dubbed the “flexible euro.”

 

And

Nancy Unger, professor of history at Santa Clara University and author of the book Belle La Follete: Progressive Era Reformer.

About the Book:

Belle La FolleteIn 1931, the New York Times hailed Belle Case La Follette as “probably the least known yet most influential of all the American women who have had to do with public affairs.” A dedicated advocate for women’s suffrage, peace, and other causes, she served as a key advisor to her husband, leading Progressive politician Robert La Follette. She also wielded considerable influence through her own speeches and journalism, as when she opposed racism by speaking out against the segregation of the federal government under President Woodrow Wilson.

In a concise, lively, and engaging narrative, Nancy C. Unger shows how Belle La Follette uniquely contributed to progressive reform, as well as the ways her work was typical of women–and progressives–of her time. Supported by primary documents and a robust companion website, this book introduces us to an extraordinary woman and the era of Progressive reform.

 

 

 

 

 

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